New Courses

EXSC 1410 - Jogging/Running – summer (starts June 17)

This course is designed to examine jogging/running as a means of improving cardiovascular fitness and promoting it as a lifelong activity. The American College of Sports Medicines (ACSM) physical activity guidelines will provide a framework for class requirements as well as aid in developing fitness goals that emphasize cardiovascular health. NOTE: Students will be expected to participate in running/jogging every week, and should be able to physically handle the nature of the activity.

EXSC 1460 – Fitness Walking – summer/fall (starts July 8)

This course is designed to examine walking as a means of improving fitness and promoting it as a lifelong activity. The American College of Sports Medicines (ACSM) physical activity guidelines will provide a framework for class requirements as well as aid in developing fitness goals that emphasize cardiovascular health. NOTE: Students will be expected to participate in fitness walking, and will be required to log daily walks through the Polar Beat smart phone app/website.

HLTH 1000 – Introduction to Mindfulness – fall

Students will develop an understanding of the current research on mindfulness and meditation practices. The focus of this class will be to train students to enter a calm and centered state of awareness through working with the body, breath and mind.

PHYS 1231 and 1232 – Modification of PHYS 1201 and 1202 – Principles of Physics I and II – fall

An algebra-based course for students needing a fuller introduction to physics than would be found in a general education/survey course. Topics include straight-line and circular motion, Newtons Laws, torque & static equilibrium, conservation of energy, fluids, thermal physics & thermodynamics, periodic motion. Optional topics are free energy. Applications will be drawn from several areas, including (but not limited to) those appropriate to the biological/medical/health career fields. Concepts of right-triangle trigonometry will be introduced as needed.(4 hours lecture, 2 hours lab). Prerequisite: Completion of either MATH 1150 or MATH 1180 with a C or better OR eligibility for either MATH 1170 or MATH 1221 through College math placement score OR consent of the instructor.

An algebra-based course for students needing a fuller introduction to physics than would be found in a general education/survey course. Topics include: wave motion, sound, optics, electricity, DC circuits, magnetism, interactions between radiation & matter. Optional topics are feedback processes. Applications will be drawn from several areas, including (but not limited to) those appropriate to the biological/medical/health career fields. This course may be taken before or after PHYS 1201. Concepts of motion, energy, and right-triangle trigonometry will be introduced as needed. (4 hours lecture, 2 hours lab). Prerequisite: Completion of either MATH 1150 or MATH 1180 with a C or better OR eligibility for either MATH 1170 or MATH 1221 through College math placement score OR consent of the instructor.

GCST 1502 – Human trafficking – fall

This course will explore human trafficking within the context of social justice, human rights, and feminist perspectives. We will analyze the behavior of traffickers and the ways this crime affects our global economy. We will examine criminal justice, vulnerabilities of victims and types of trafficking and how communities are responding to this activity. Students will gain an overall understanding of modern-day slavery and the issues we face regarding this crime.

GCST 1964 – African American Civil Rights Immersion Experience – fall

This course will focus on the African American culture and the Civil Rights Movement through four themes: fragmentation, exclusion, resistance, and community. Particular attention will be given to the diversity of African diasporas within the United States. The African American Civil Rights Immersion Experience is designed to provide an up-close immersive experience of some of the events, places, people and systems throughout the United States that have helped shape and define contemporary African American theories. This course will be framed within the civil rights movement, including its social organization, customs and traditions, religion, and its arts and literature. The course challenges students to utilize and address issues such as political power, economic systems, racism, and activism. This course includes in-class participation and an off campus expedition to historical civil rights sites in the United States.**Students must receive approval through the Diversity and Equity office prior to registering for the course**